Arms and Armour Gallery

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The artworks in this gallery include:

"Shining in Knight's Armour" by an unknown artist -- [TM: Ankh-Morporkian culture]

This is the traditional full suit of armour worn by knights wanting to be more shiny than impaled. Its helmet is down and it holds a lance in one hand. It is well maintained and is polished to a high sheen.

"Chocolate Breastplate" by an unknown artist

This is one of the few remaining pieces of armour from the Confectioners' Guild short-lived range of personal and edible combat protection. It has toffee straps and is covered with small biscuit wafers for extra protection. The sugar sprinkles around the edge finish the look.

"Morning Star" by an unknown artist -- [TM: Djelian culture]

This nasty weapon consists of a long piece of wood with a chain at one end. Connected to the chain is a spiked ball. The morning star has seen better days and is now quite rusted.

Imrad Al'Mekhir's "Crescent Moon Sword" -- [TM: Djelian culture]

A large sword with an elegant curve, this sword looks like a crescent moon. It was crafted by a master weaponsmith and was donated to the museum after the "incident" with Klatch over the island of Leshp.

Theodore Locke's "The Stabber" -- [TM: Ankh-Morporkian culture]

Intricately decorated and encrusted with jewels, this dagger looks more like an ornamental weapon than one designed to be used in combat. It was said to have been owned by a former Patrician of the city, Mad Lord Snapcase.

"Very Long Sword" by an unknown artist -- [TM: Lancrastian culture]

Made from the finest steel, this very long sword is a massive six feet in length. One wonders if it ever served any practical purpose on the battlefield, it looks as though it would be so heavy that a team of men would be needed to lift it. Clearly the weaponsmith had heard that size matters.

"Crossbow" by an unknown artist

Thought to be one of the earliest crossbows made, this weapon is nowhere near as sophisticated as its counterparts today. It has a simple, brute force draw mechanism and its bow string is now quite loose but, make no mistake, it was an effective and deadly weapon in its day.


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